Wiley College
Historically Black College

 

 

 

 

 

 

King Home, Marshall, Texas Index

Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1882

Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1884

Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1886

Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1891

Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1897

Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1898

Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1899

Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1900

 Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1901

Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1902

 Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1903

 Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1904

Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1906

 Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1908

Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1909

 Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1910

 Negro Education: A Study of the Private and Higher Schools1915

Woman's home missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church - 1920

Woman's home missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church - 1922

 


 

KING HOME, MARSHALL, TEX.

The colored population of Texas numbers nine hundred thousand souls. "King Industrial Home," located at Marshall, is in what is known as the "Black Belt" of the State, where the ratio of the races, colored and white, is as twenty to one. Two hundred and fifty thousand of the former live within a radius of one hundred miles of Marshall. Moreover, three thousand persons of Negro blood are employed in the State as teachers in the public schools. With what meager equipment these go forth to instruct the rising generation, let the prevailing conditions of poverty, illiteracy, and superstition suggest.

A beacon light of promise in this wide waste stands the Wiley University of the Freedmen's Aid Society, and by its side materialized, in 1890, the Industrial Home of the Woman's Home Missionary Society, named in honor of Mrs. Jane King, of Delaware, O., "the dear saint who bequeathed one thousand five hundred dollars for this purpose." The addition of other gifts, and years of painstaking labors on the part of the Bureau Secretaries, provided this large and beautiful Home, in which thirty-eight girls could be housed, receiving the most careful training in domestic economy. That their religious culture was not being neglected is proven by the statement made in 1898, "Every girl but one is a Christian." One hundred and twenty-five students from the university shared with those in the Home the class-teaching in the housekeeping and industrial arts.

It was during the incumbency of Mrs. Albright that this Home was erected. She supervised the building and furnishing, installed the teachers, and started it successfully on its blessed mission. Mrs. Hickman followed on similar lines. Both of these ladies visited and inspected the work at short range. In 1899, Mrs. Murphy also, by advice of the Board, paid a visit to King Home, and brought to the Annual Meeting of that year a most encouraging report. Heating arrangements had been provided, and the third story, so long unfurnished, had been made habitable, affording room for twenty additional girls, and no debt had been incurred. She said: "Every such school is a veritable lighthouse, and we dare not cease our efforts until the radiance of one reaches another and the whole land is full of light. Out of the fifty girls in the Home this year forty-eight are members of the Church." And year after year these go out among their own people as light-bearers, as teachers and home-makers, and, almost without exception, as examples of influential Christian womanhood.

Miss Elizabeth O. Elliott, of this Home, has been called by those who know, "the model Superintendent."

At Harrisburg, Tex., a point where work for colored girls could be profitably maintained, sixty acres of land has been deeded to the Woman's Home Missionary Society by Rev. F. Carson Moore, with a proviso that four thousand dollars in permanent improvements must be put upon it before the deed is in force.

 

 

 

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