Wiley College
Historically Black College

 

 

 

 

 

King Industrial Home, Marshall.

" ALL things come to him who waits." says the old proverb. King Home was built in 1890, and, I presume for lack of funds, was not completed. When I was appointed Secretary of the Texas Bureau three years ago. I found the third story still unfinished. The room was badly needed on account of the crowded condition of the Home.

I rejoice to be able to tell you that the finishing of the entire third story is an accomplished fact. Twenty girls additional can now be accommodated. I hold in my hand the duplicate receipts for the expenses, and there is not a dollar of debt remaining. This improvement, through the financial ability of our efficient Superintendent (Miss Elliott), has been made from the receipts of the Home, without a dollar being drawn from the General Treasury.

Very soon after the Annual Meeting had granted my petition last year, I began negotiations for the purchase of the land adjoining our property. I found that the land upon which the cabins had been erected the previous year, and which I hoped could be turned into "model homes," could not be bought at any priceŚwe had lost our opportunity by our delay. I found, also, that the title to the triangular piece of ground of which I spoke last year, and which was so necessary to us, was somewhat complicated by being owned by a mother and children, some of whom were minors. But after consultation with Mr. Boyd, our legal adviser, and with Mrs. Rust and the Board of Managers. I purchased the undivided half-interest in the property. Mr. Boyd transacted the business, securing the abstract of title and all necessary papers, filing them in the archives of our Society. This purchase gives us control of half the ground, and will prevent cabins being built, which would annoy us and seriously injure our property.

The school was never in a better condition. Nine more boarding pupils were enrolled than ever before, making a total of forty-seven, with one hundred and thirty-nine day scholars, making a total of one hundred and eighty-six.

There has been no case of discipline reported during the year, which speaks well for the moral and religious instruction, and the work has moved on pleasantly and successfully.

Special attention has been given to the Dressmaking Department. A class of fourteen graduated. During Commencement week a drafting. contest was held, in which several of the girls showed their proficiency and skill. Dr. Boatman, of my own Conference, preached the baccalaureate sermon at Wiley University in May, and attended this exercise as well as some others, and he speaks in highest praise of the management of the school, and especially of the deportment and personnel of the students.

Perhaps there never was a time when our work among the colored people in the South was more important and imperative. The outrages perpetrated by the ignorant and vicious, and the tardy justice of the courts, the erroneous ideas concerning the so-called race problem, which is in reality the problem of humanity, calls upon all lovers of law, order, and justice to make greater efforts for the educating and Christianizing of these poor people. They must have hands and brain trained, as well as heart, to make them industrial factors. They must be led out from the errors which have been fastened upon them by centuries of bondage, and taught a better knowledge of the duties of home, a keener appreciation of the sanctity of marriage, a greater regard for the property of others, and a clearer conception of what virtue in womanhood signifies, and that, if need be, they should risk life to defend it. There is a deep-rooted prejudice as to how the Negro should be treated. Shakespeare represents Shylock, as defending the imperishable nature of man, in these words: " Hath not a Jew eyes? If you prick us, do we not bleed

Page 97 Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1898-1899

King Industrial Home, Marshall.

" ALL things come to him who waits." says the old proverb. King Home was built in 1890, and, I presume for lack of funds, was not completed. When I was appointed Secretary of the Texas Bureau three years ago. I found the third story still unfinished. The room was badly needed on account of the crowded condition of the Home.

I rejoice to be able to tell you that the finishing of the entire third story is an accomplished fact. Twenty girls additional can now be accommodated. I hold in my hand the duplicate receipts for the expenses, and there is not a dollar of debt remaining. This improvement, through the financial ability of our efficient Superintendent (Miss Elliott), has been made from the receipts of the Home, without a dollar being drawn from the General Treasury.

Very soon after the Annual Meeting had granted my petition last year, I began negotiations for the purchase of the land adjoining our property. I found that the land upon which the cabins had been erected the previous year, and which I hoped could be turned into "model homes," could not be bought at any priceŚwe had lost our opportunity by our delay. I found, also, that the title to the triangular piece of ground of which I spoke last year, and which was so necessary to us, was somewhat complicated by being owned by a mother and children, some of whom were minors. But after consultation with Mr. Boyd, our legal adviser, and with Mrs. Rust and the Board of Managers. I purchased the undivided half-interest in the property. Mr. Boyd transacted the business, securing the abstract of title and all necessary papers, filing them in the archives of our Society. This purchase gives us control of half the ground, and will prevent cabins being built, which would annoy us and seriously injure our property.

The school was never in a better condition. Nine more boarding pupils were enrolled than ever before, making a total of forty-seven, with one hundred and thirty-nine day scholars, making a total of one hundred and eighty-six.

There has been no case of discipline reported during the year, which speaks well for the moral and religious instruction, and the work has moved on pleasantly and successfully.

Special attention has been given to the Dressmaking Department. A class of fourteen graduated. During Commencement week a drafting. contest was held, in which several of the girls showed their proficiency and skill. Dr. Boatman, of my own Conference, preached the baccalaureate sermon at Wiley University in May, and attended this exercise as well as some others, and he speaks in highest praise of the management of the school, and especially of the deportment and personnel of the students.

Perhaps there never was a time when our work among the colored people in the South was more important and imperative. The outrages perpetrated by the ignorant and vicious, and the tardy justice of the courts, the erroneous ideas concerning the so-called race problem, which is in reality the problem of humanity, calls upon all lovers of law, order, and justice to make greater efforts for the educating and Christianizing of these poor people. They must have hands and brain trained, as well as heart, to make them industrial factors. They must be led out from the errors which have been fastened upon them by centuries of bondage, and taught a better knowledge of the duties of home, a keener appreciation of the sanctity of marriage, a greater regard for the property of others, and a clearer conception of what virtue in womanhood signifies, and that, if need be, they should risk life to defend it. There is a deep-rooted prejudice as to how the Negro should be treated. Shakespeare represents Shylock, as defending the imperishable nature of man, in these words: " Hath not a Jew eyes? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?"

We can not evade responsibility. Whatever is justice for any is justice for all, and as one has said, "Our hope is in treating the Negro as we do the white man, the Negro child as we do the white child, and both with justice." Christian education is the solution of the Northern problem; Christian education is the solution of the Southern problem; Christian education is the solution of the problem of humanity. Nothing else will develop symmetrically the individual faculties or perfect society as a whole.

MRS. LAVANDA G. MURPHY. Secretary.

? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?"

We can not evade responsibility. Whatever is justice for any is justice for all, and as one has said, "Our hope is in treating the Negro as we do the white man, the Negro child as we do the white child, and both with justice." Christian education is the solution of the Northern problem; Christian education is the solution of the Southern problem; Christian education is the solution of the problem of humanity. Nothing else will develop symmetrically the individual faculties or perfect society as a whole.

MRS. LAVANDA G. MURPHY. Secretary.

WEST TEXAS CONFERENCE.

This year has been one of mingled pain, disappointments, and disaster. I was attacked with rheumatism directly after our Annual Conference, and have not been able to travel over my work as usual. In June the greatest overflow known in Texas passed over a large portion of our Conference, which swept away all my people. This left them in a deplorable condition. It was pitiful, indeed, to see my peopleŚmen, women, and childrenŚnaked, hungry, and not a place to rest their weary limbs. Sickness and death followed this flood, and thus the Woman's Home Missionary Society lost many members. Those who survived are too poor to give to our cause. The Auxiliaries not located in the flood districts have blended their force together, and have done a wonderful missionary work by sending them clothing, bedding, food, and money. However, we have raised to date more money for our Training and Industrial School than the whole of last year. I have tried to keep the work alive by writing often to each Auxiliary; but letters do not do the good a visit does. Still we are not discouraged, knowing if we would win we first must lose. Our Anniversary was held at Denison, December 8, 1898. Four of our District Associations were held during the summer months. Reports showed earnest work along all lines New Auxiliaries have been organized and several Mothers' Jewels. Our need is the Training and Industrial Home. My entire Conference bemoans the death of our truly beloved Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. R. S. Rust.

Mrs. E. S. Spriggs, Conference Corresponding Secretary.

Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home Missionary Society 1899

 

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