Texas Almanac

 

 

 

In 1910 there were 33 saw mills in operation in Upshur County; prior to 1907 there were 90 saw mills running. 

 

 

County Description from various years of the Texas Almanac

 

1904 Texas Almanac

UPSHUR COUNTY Is situated In northeast Texas, 92 miles southwest from Texarkana, 100 miles east from Dallas. If. is bounded on the south by Sabine river, on the east by Gregg. Harrison and Marion Counties, on the north by Big Cypress, Morris and Camp Counties, and on the west by Wood County. Gilmer is the county seat, in the center of the county, and is 37 miles northeast from Tyler. The county is located in the heart of the piney woods of northeast Texas. Population in 1900 was 16,266. Property assessment, 1903, $2,743.300. The general trend of the county is undulating, sloping from northwest to southeast, and is sufficient to give first-class drainage. On the west and northwest the lands are generally level, on the northeast and southeast the lands are hilly or mountainous, while on the south, east and north the lands are undulating. Upshur County is one among the best timbered and watered counties in the State, and is the natural home of the various oaks, hickories, pine, sweet-gum, black-gum, dogwood, cottonwood, ash, walnut, mulberry, sassafras, persimmon, blackhaw, redhaw and holly. The pecan grows to perfection. There are a number of living streams in the county that furnish an abundance of water to every portion of it. The lands are divided into bottom and upland, and farms, as a rule, have both kinds of land, which yield bountiful crops of every description. The soil of the county is composed of a dark sandy, a red sandy, and a light sandy soil, with an occasional stiff black waxy bottom, and ranges from one foot to ten feet deep, with a red chocolate clay sub-soil. The important streams are Sabine river, Big Sandy, Lilly, Kelsey. White Oak, Glade, Gum, Caney, Prairie, Walnut, Medlin. Greasy, Big Cypress, Little Cypress and Richland creeks ; the lakes are Lilly, Mud, Green, Carter, Stout, Sabine, Black, Covín, Bule and Simpson, all of which afford for the fisherman the finest of sport. Water can be obtained in any part of the county in abundance and of the best quality at 20 to 75 feet from the surface, while first- class and ever flowing springs are found in every part of the county. The principal crops are : Cotton, which yielded in 1903 about one-half a bale to the acre upon an average, though there is bottom land that will easily make a bale per acre: corn, which yields about 20 bushels per acre upon an average, while some farmers claim to make 40 and 50 bushels per acre ; ribbon cane, which yielded from 300 to 500 gallons per acre. The other crops are cow-peas, peanuts, sweet and Irish potatoes, fruits of all kinds and of the finest quality. In the line of manufacturing there are several saw mills, some of which have a capacity of 20,000 to 85.000 feet of lumber per day. There are two canning factories, one at Big Sandy and the other at Shady Grove. There are numerous gins, grist mills, shingle mills, syrup mills, etc. Land, unimproved, $5 to $25 per acre ; improved, $10 to $50. There are 41 common public school districts In the county, with two independent districts, one at Gilmer, the other at Big Sandy. The county is under the district school system with a scholastic population of 4425. The Texas & Pacific railway runs entirely across the southern part of the county, the Cotton Belt entirely through the center of the county from north to south, while the Texas Southern runs through the center from east to west, the latter two passing through Gilmer, each of said roads having about thirty miles of track in the county. Gilmer has a population of some 3000 ; the other towns are Big Sandy on the south, located at the crossing of the Texas & Pacific and Cotton Belt railways, with a population of something like 1000 ; West Mountain. Glenwood, Ashland on the east, Coffeeville on the northeast, Lafayette and Bettie on the north, Simpsonville on the northwest, Rosewood, Brice and Rhonesboro on the west and Shady Grove on the southwest. More lands are being cleared and put In cultivation than ever before in the county's history. — S. C. HART, Gilmer.

- Texas Almanac and State Industrial Guide - 1904

 

 

1910 Texas Almanac

Upshur County lies in Northeast Texas. 02 miles southwest of Texarkana. It was organized from portions of Nacogdoches and Harrison Counties In 1846 and named for Abel P. Upshur Its estimated population is 21.000; Gilmer, the county seat, has about 2,800, Big Sandy 840 Total assessment, $4,402,140. The surface is undulating sloping from northwest to southeast. On the west and northwest the lands are generally level on the northeast and southeast they are hilly or mountainous, while on the south, east and north they are undulating Upshur is one among the best timbered and watered counties in the State and Is the natural home of the various oaks, hickories, pine sweet gum black gum, dogwood, cottonwood, ash. walnut, mulberry, sassafras persimmon, blackhaw, redhaw and holly. The pecan grows to perfection There are a number of living streams that furnish an abundance of  water. The lands are divided into bottom and upland and farms as a rule, have both kinds of land, which yield bountiful crops of every description. The soil is composed of a dark sandy, a red sandy and a light sandy soil, with an occasional stiff black waxy bottom and ranges from one foot to 10 feet deep, with a red chocolate clay sub-soil The important streams are Sabine River, Big Sandy, Lilly, Kelsey White Oak. Glade, Gum. Caney, Prairie, Walnut, Medlin, Greasy Big Cypress, Little Cypress and Richland Creeks; the lakes are Lily, Mud, Green, Carter, Stout, Sabine, Black, Covin, Buie and Simpson, all of which afford for the fisherman the finest of sport. Water can be obtained In abundance at 20 to 75 feet, while first-class and ever flowing springs are found in every part of the county. Raw land sells at an average price of $5 per acre, cultivated land $10 per acre. The principal crops  with their average yields per acre are as follows: Cotton, one-half bale- corn. 16 bushels; sugar cane for syrup, 300 gallons; Irish potatoes, 100 bushels; sweet potatoes, 75 bushels; peanuts, 100 bushels. Peaches are grown in abundance and several car loads are sent out of the county each year; other fruits grown are apples, pears, grapes and berries All vegetables grow prolifically; both kinds of potatoes and watermelons are shipped in car load quantities. This is not a cattle raising country, as the term is generally accepted; several stock farmers feed steers for the beef market and considerable shipments are made to the packeries. There were assessed last year 11,610 cattle, 5,675 horses and mules, 7,769 hogs, 408 goats and 242 sheep. The St. Louis Southwestern Railroad crosses the county from north to south, and the Marshall and East Texas Railroad from east to west. The county has several hundred million feet of standing merchantable timber, including both soft and hard woods. There are 33 saw mills In operation; prior to 1907 there were 90 saw mills running. The manufacturing industries include 50 cotton gins, 15 shingle mills and a box and crate factory at Big Sandy. It Is estimated that the annual output of cotton and lumber approximates $9.000.000. The county has 85 public free schools, engaging 116 teachers.

 

1911 Texas Almanac

Created from Nacogdoches and Harrison Counties In 1840 and organized the same year. Named for Abel P. Upshur. Situated in East Texas. Area, 587 square miles. Surface undulating, mostly level in the west and northwest, and hilly in the east and northeast. There are many streams and springs with freestone water at a moderate depth. The county is one of the best timbered In the State, the lumber industry employing many men. Soils, dark, red and gray sandy, with some black waxy. All are highly productive of cotton, corn and general staple field crops, as well as of horticultural products. Truck farming is general. Stock raising In connection with general farming is becoming au important industry. Gilmer, the county seat, is reached by the St. Louis & Southwestern and Marshall & East Texas Railroads. Big Sandy Is also an Important town in the county.

- Texas Almanac and State Industrial Guide - 1910 -11

 

 

 

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