Notes - A Report of surgical cases treated in the Army of the United States 

 

 

 

 

XXII.Memorandum of a Fatal Gunshot Wound of the Brain. By Carlos Carvallo, Assistant Surgeon, U. S. A.

Private Walter R. Stone, Co. F, 4th United States Cavalry, aged 22 years, was admitted to the post hospital at Jefferson, Texas, March 4, 1869, with a gunshot wound caused by the accidental discharge of his carbine. The missile entered the left eye, traversed the brain, and escaped through the occipital bone. He died March 4, 1869.

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XXVII.Report of Two Cases of Suicide. By Carlos Carvallo, Assistant Surgeon, U. S. A.

At Jefferson, Texas, December 31, 1869, Lieutenant E. P. Colby, 11th United States Infantry, aged 24, committed suicide. He used a small Derringer pistol. The ball entered the cranium about an inch above and behind the right ear, and lodged in the brain. A protuberance on the opposite side of the skull rendered it probable that the ball fractured the inner table of the left temporal bone, but did not penetrate it. Lieutenant Colby became instantaneously unconscious, and the wound proved fatal in about a half hour after its infliction. He was in articulo mortis when first seen by me, and expired about fifteen minutes thereafter.

Private George Weiss, Co. H, 11th United States Infantry, aged 32 years, shot himself near Fort Jefferson, Texas, on May 28,1870, with a rifle, from ear to ear. He was found in the woods half a mile from camp, with his brain scattered a distance of several yards from the body. All bones of the craninm and face, except the upper and lower maxillary, were fractured. (See Specimen 5922, Sect. I, A. M. M.)

 

XC V Memorandum of a Case of Gunshot Wound of the Heart. By Carlos Carvallo, Assistant

Surgeon, U. S. A.

At Jefferson, Texas, First Sergeant Daniel Murphy, Co. I, 11th United States Infantry, aged 25 years, committed suicide, on September 19, 1870, by shooting himself with a small Derringer pistol, the ball penetrating the left lung and the heart. He lived twenty-seven minutes after being shot.

 

Private William Christman, Co. D, 11th United States Infantry, aged 24 years, Jefferson, Texas, May 7, 1869. Gunshot wound of the right buttock, caused by the accidental discharge of a rifle. Duty, May 10, 1869.

 

Private William Barry, Co. G, 6th Cavalry, aged 30. Jefferson, Texas, May 7,1869. Gunshot flesh-wound of the right leg. Duty, June, 1869.

CCCXXVI.Mention of an Incised Wound of the Foot. By A. L. Buffington, M. D., Acting Assistant Surgeon.

Private Fontanice Singleton, Co. D, 20th Infantry, aged 20 years, was admitted to the post hospital at Jefferson, Texas, on December 3, 1867, with an incised wound upon the dorsal surface of the left foot, inflicted with an axe. The parts were retained in apposition by adhesive plaster, He was returned to duty December 11,1867.


CCCCXLII.Memorandum of a Case of Luxation of the Atlas on the Axis. J K Walsh, Acting Assistant Surgeon.

Lieutenant Justinian  Alman, Troop I, 4th Cavalry, was killed March 17, 1868, in a collision between the boat in which he was returning to town (Jefferson, Texas) and the steamboat J. M. Sharpe. He was struck by the paddles of the wheel and carried under. His body was once thrown to the surface by the eddies of the water, and then sank. Every effort was made to secure his remains, but without avail, until the sixth day after the disaster, when the body, in a very advanced stage of decomposition, rose to the surface. The remains were buried the following day, in the Hebrew Cemetery, in compliance with the wish of his family. An autopsy revealed a dislocation of the atlas upon the second cervical vertebra, with rupture of the transverse ligament, and the odontoid process impinging upon the spinal marrow.

 

 

A Report of surgical cases treated in the Army of the United States from 1865 to 1871

 

 

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